Monthly Archives: August 2010

… can we work the money out?

This is the easiest of all the questions you’ll be asked in the interviewing process and, interesting enough, it only amounts for 10% of the hiring decision … and it is the easiest of all the questions to deal with …

The reason that it is easiest to deal with is that if you do a good job in all of the other questions … the really hard questions.. the money usually takes care of itself …. money and the discussion of money rarley end up making a difference in a candidate excepting a job or not…

Many people looking for a job talk about money in the initial stages of interviewing process simply because it is a common denominator and while they may not be able to define a job that they might consider or might want without being too abstract, they can discuss money in very concrete terms…

Don’t be nervous about money and don’t overreact to it one way or the other… but when it comes time to speak about money approach it like you would any other issue… is fair to ask what kind of money is associated with the position, if you don’t know that already

do not have any preconceived “bottom line figure”  that you will or won’t accept … it’s more important to consider many other aspects of the job before you consider money…

remember that money and title are the two most flexible things that an employer has to deal with and they are the two issues  most influenced by performance…

Now, if you are presently employed and you have for offers that you are considering, you may have a little leverage when it comes to discussing money with a perspective employer … if you have been out of work for six months and this is the only job offer you’ve even come close to, you’re likely to be a lot more flexible…

try to always discuss money face to face … try to never do it over the phone and don’t get too nervous about it … simply state what you think is fair after you hear what the employer thinks is there and try to take an “we’re all and this together” approach … never be confrontational or adversarial…

And contrary to most people’s beliefs, companies are not trying to pay as little as they can and candidates are not necessarily trying to get as much as they can… This has to be a really good deal for everybody and nobody should feel taken advantage of… If you take it a “we’re all in this together … let’s try to work it out together ” approach it will be easy and fruitful for both of you…

Practice your discussion of money with your spouse or a trusted friend

…are you a risk?

since 1973, I have never met a candidate that thought they were a risk… Every candidate that I ever interviewed thought that they would be a glowing employee and that hiring them would never be any kind of risk for a hiring authority…

But the truth is, every candidate is a risk in some way … and every hiring authority, whether you like it or not is looking at what kind of a “risk” you pose to them…

The hiring authority is asking himself or herself, “if I hire this candidate what is in his or her background that is going to cause me to regret hiring them … are they going to be here a short period of time … are they going to fail on the job … am I going to have to fire them? ”

“risk factors”come with every one … a number of years ago,  I placed a candidate with a company who had a heart attack and died about a month into the job … the hiring authority, when he called me, implied that I should have known that the candidate had a bad heart… Go figure?! … now I realize that he was simply venting his frustration, but how could I know the candidate was going to die?

30% of the hiring authority’s consideration of  you as a candidate is going to be based on what kind of “risk” you are … in other words how is it not going to work out with you as a candidate when you become an employee?

Some “risk factors” are obvious … if you have had three jobs in three years, the hiring authority is going to be concerned that if he or she hires you you’ll only be there one year… If you have made significantly more money than the job pays, the hiring authority is going to be concerned that even if you take the job, you will keep looking for a higher paying job… If you’ve been the president of the company or the owner of a company, the hiring authority is going to be concerned that you’re going to come into the organization and “tell them” how they ought to run it… If you have been a bit of work for an extended period of time, the hiring authority is going to wander why you haven’t been able to find a job … never mind that unemployment is high and good jobs are difficult to find, you’re still going to get this question…

So, as you prepare to interview, think about what kind of “risk factors” you pose to a potential employer … don’t give me that business of “I’m not a risk”… because every one poses some kind of risk to a perspective employer…

Be sure, in your presentation of yourself to perspective employers that you offset the risks that you pose … and you know what those risks are … if you’ve had three jobs in three years be ready to offset that concern … if you’ve been out of work for an extended period of time be ready to offset that concern…

But offset these risks in the presentation of yourself BEFORE they come up or you have to be asked, … you can even make them a positive … something along the line of, “I realize that I’ve had three jobs in three years so, whoever I go to work for is going to get a five year to seven year commitment from me and as long as they’re around, I’ll be there… I can’t afford another short stint on my resume. ”  Do  this before you are asked, “why have you had so many jobs in the last few years? ”

Think about your risk factors … deal with them!

…do we like you?

This amounts to 40% of hiring decision … that’s right 40% … people really don’t like hearing this… It makes everyone uncomfortable because they think that hiring ought to be more “fair”  then having your personality and being liked play that much of a role in the hiring process…

But that’s the way it is … reality, whether you like it or not… people hire who they like and they don’t hire who they don’t like, no matter how qualified to candidate might be…

In fact, I have seen more less than qualified candidates… event downright unqualified candidates hired because they were liked then you can ever imagine… and, as a corollary, I have never seen even the momst well qualified candidate hired that wasn’t liked by a the interviewing and hiring authorities…

What does this mean? Well, it means that you need to be a “likable” person in the interviewing process … it means being warm, friendly, engaging, vulnerable and affable without being contrived … it means being able to communicate yourself and your successes in stories that people can identify with … it means identifying with the interviewing and hiring authorities…( it sure helps to do research on these people when you are going to interview with them … any common knowledge or experiences are always appreciated)…

Simply realizing that this issue is so much a part of the hiring decision gives you an advantage… practice your interviewing style… practice being “likable”…